Genre: Dystopia

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Review: Idols (Icons #2) by Margaret Stohl

Review: Idols (Icons #2) by Margaret Stohl

August 19, 2014 Review 0

Whereas ICONS was a fast-paced, rush of a novel, IDOLS is a slow burn, with bits and pieces offered to the reader throughout, until the big reveal at the end. While not a bad thing, my expectation was for a higher level of action, and I was mildly disappointed at the resulting slowness.

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5!bat Review: Of Metal and Wishes (Of Metal and Wishes #1) by Sarah Fine

5!bat Review: Of Metal and Wishes (Of Metal and Wishes #1) by Sarah Fine

August 8, 2014 Review 4

OF METAL AND WISHES hits that perfect blend of interesting world building, real characters, and romantic danger. Reminiscent of The Phantom of the Opera and THE HUNGER GAMES, these familiar components click together to create an altogether different dynamic. I couldn’t get this story out of my head until the very last page, and now I daydream about what comes next.

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5!Bat Review: The Buried Life (Buried Life #1) by Carrie Patel

5!Bat Review: The Buried Life (Buried Life #1) by Carrie Patel

August 2, 2014 Review 0

In a future where bureaucracy and totalitarianism have supplanted capitalism as our national language, the city of Recoletta’s own police force has a hard time getting permission to do its job. In Carrie Patel’s THE BURIED LIFE everything is compartmentalized and strictly need-to-know, which makes solving a series of murders amongst the elite very difficult. Not that that would stop a couple of investigators looking for the truth.

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Review: Magic City: Recent Spells edited by Paula Guran

Review: Magic City: Recent Spells edited by Paula Guran

June 21, 2014 Review 2

Short stories are a difficult form to master in any case, but when it comes to sci-fi and fantasy, the author has an even tougher challenge: building an entire world in just a few pages. As with any short-story collection featuring multiple authors, some of the contributions to MAGIC CITY: RECENT SPELLS, edited by Paula Guran, are more successful than others. Ultimately, I think the anthology does a great job of showcasing many different interpretations of ‘urban fantasy’ and gives readers the chance to discover something new.

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Review: The Lost (The Lost #1) by Sarah Beth Durst

Review: The Lost (The Lost #1) by Sarah Beth Durst

May 29, 2014 Review 1

From an initial, chilling fall into darkness, Sarah Beth Durst brings hope and magic to a horrific, almost apocalyptic landscape. Don’t pick up this book unless you have time to make it through at least the first half of Lauren’s journey, as her grief and circumstances will make it painful to leave her until she finds her footing.

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Release Day Review: Expiration Day by William Campbell Powell

Release Day Review: Expiration Day by William Campbell Powell

April 22, 2014 Review 0

I always enjoy books that make me think about the basic question of what it means to be human. EXPIRATION DAY is definitely one of those books. Set in a not-so-far future, where most humans can’t have children, we get all the classics: can robots be creative? Can they experience emotion? If they’re creative and emotional, are they not as human as homo sapiens? These are all fascinating questions to ponder, and rather than detract from the story, they add to it, giving a somewhat regular “coming of age” story depth and a completely different angle.

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Review: The Haven by Carol Lynch Williams

Review: The Haven by Carol Lynch Williams

April 8, 2014 Review 0

THE HAVEN is a thrilling, romantic way to introduce young readers to dystopian human rights, but may not be satisfying for anyone who knows where Soylent Green comes from or who has been to The Island with Ewan McGregor. A short, age-appropriate adventure, THE HAVEN is best suited for a younger audience.

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Review: Fire & Flood (Fire & Flood #1) by Victoria Scott

Review: Fire & Flood (Fire & Flood #1) by Victoria Scott

February 27, 2014 Review 1

The first novel in Victoria Scott’s new YA series is CATCHING FIRE, THE GOLDEN COMPASS, and The Amazing Race all rolled into one. But imagine if Katniss couldn’t hunt, or Lyra couldn’t communicate with Pantalaimon. Now imagine that they were still determined to do whatever it took to save those they loved and you’ll understand Tella Holloway’s dilemma in FIRE & FLOOD.

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Review: The Office of Mercy by Ariel Djanikian

Review: The Office of Mercy by Ariel Djanikian

February 11, 2014 Review 2

I’m going to be completely honest here and say what we’re all thinking – a comparison to both George Orwell and Suzanne Collins in the same sentence doesn’t exactly make sense, does it? And while I appreciate the publisher’s desire to pull in THE HUNGER GAMES’ audience, if you go into THE OFFICE OF MERCY looking for another Katniss, you’re going to be disappointed. Not because THE OFFICE OF MERCY is in any way inferior to THE HUNGER GAMES, but it’s a totally different type of book – in the same way that Collins and Orwell wrote very different works, even though they may both have books that take place in dystopian environments.

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